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Manfred F. Ricciardelli Jr., LLC
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Q
Can I get workers’ compensation if my office chair is causing hip pain?

A

Yes. As incredible as it may seem, thousands of workers are injured by their office chairs every year—many because their employer chose the chairs for their looks, rather than comfort. Even more surprising is how many employees fail to connect their injury to the office chair, assuming that old age, a prior injury, or even their weight is the source of their pain. As a result, many workers do not realize the daily damage done by an uncomfortable chair, giving up their rights to workers’ compensation benefits.

Check this list to find out if your office chair may be causing pain (and damage) in your:

  • Hips. Hip pain is common in employees who do not adjust their work chairs to fit their bodies. Both the chair height and seat angle adjustments can relieve stress on your hips by changing the angle of your pelvis when sitting. Unfortunately, many workers do not have the benefit of adjustable chairs (and those who do may share those chairs with other workers, making it likely that the settings will change).
  • Back. While nurses at Goryeb Children's Hospital might not get much of a chance to sit down during the day, the little time they do get could be permanently damaging their backs. The curved back of an office chair can alter the normal alignment of a worker’s spine, increasing the risk of an injury at any point in the future.
  • Neck. Your chair’s position could be to blame for your peering at a computer screen or constantly turning your head between different displays. While you could ask your employer for a more ergonomic chair, he may be resistant until you can prove that you have a medical issue.
  • Knees. A chair that is too high or too short for you can cause undue stress on all of your joints, particularly your knees. Twisting, falling, or turning in an improper chair can cause a torn meniscus, ACL, and other knee joint damage. Your knees should come to a 90-degree angle while you are sitting, and your work area should allow you to turn in your chair with no obstructions to your legs.

While workers’ compensation can cover the costs of joint problems caused by an office chair, you may have difficulty proving that the chair was the source of your injury. Click the contact link at the top of this page to find out how we can help you investigate your claim.

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